Still singing cardboard’s praises

Landscape fabric
Cardboard

This is two months growth. The weed fabric is the thick, expensive stuff you get at the nursery. It seems to stop small stuff like grasses, but thistles, polk, the blackberry canes all push right through it.

The cardboard is so far blocking everything. The grass that came through is only there because the cardboard there isn’t overlapping in that spot.

I think it’s boxes for me from now on.

-B

Quick Cardboard Tip

Kitties even love flat boxes

I’ve had some health stuff going on (yay arthritis) and now garden season is here so haven’t had a chance to post much but I wanted to share a quick tip.

Save your cardboard boxes for the yard and garden! I’ve been weeding and weed-eating around trees for years.

While laying down cardboard to create grass-free areas in my garden for walkways, I realized I should have been using this stuff around all my trees too.

Cardboard is great garden material and if you do a lot of online shopping like I do, there’s an endless free supply. In the garden, it holds in moisture, it keeps weeds at bay, worms absolutely LOVE the stuff and it biodegrades slowly over several years. It’s also soft enough it won’t girdle trees, which could be a danger with the plastic ‘mulch’ discs.

If you’re concerned about the look of cardboard, throw a little mulch on top. I put the discs down and jammed my tree cages through the cardboard to hold it in place. I use the heavy, thick stuff for tree rings. The thin stuff can be used to line pots, or I give it to our rabbits to shred (which eventually winds up in the garden) or tear up and throw in compost.

Back to the yard!

-B