M-O-O-N

We let our 6 year old stay up last night and watch part of the eclipse. I was afraid it was going to be too cloudy to see it here and we’d miss it, but we lucked out and the clouds cleared out a bit after dark. It really was one of the best lunar eclipses I’ve ever seen. The moon turned blood red and because it was a super moon, it was bigger and brighter than usual.

Moon1

Moon2

Just a quickie

No, I’m not dead.
LinnCreekFrozenI’m still in the throes of house remodeling and soon to be in house seeking mode. (I hope. Fingers crossed.)
I took a couple winter water shots today and thought I would share. This winter has been brutal compared to previous years, I’m a little afraid to see what plants didn’t survive the sustained cold. I suspect my crepe myrtle and Boston Ivy have both suffered. Although BOSTON Ivy should be used to long, cold winters, right? Ha. What’s in a name anyway?FrozenLake
I haven’t seen the main channel of the Lake of the Ozarks frozen over on either side for years; this year it is actually frozen in Osage Beach and on the West Side. I have heard rumors of idiotic people who drove VW Bugs across the coves in winter when I was a child. I’ve never witnessed this personally. Even in the coves, I’m not sure I’d risk it. It does make for interesting photos though.
I’m hoping house business will be finished sometime this summer and I’ll have a fabulous new yard/garden to blog about and Pin away about.
The lake photo is from Old Hwy 5 at the bridge. The other I took of the creek in Linn Creek from a friend’s bridge.

Camping at Table Rock Lake

This 4th of July weekend we camped at Table Rock Lake near Branson, Missouri.

I’m a native lake girl myself, having lived at Lake of the Ozarks my entire lifetime. I’ve watched our lake go through many changes over the years, some good and some not so great. In regards to water quality, I didn’t realize how MUCH our lake had changed until my recent visit to Table Rock. I’m sad to say there’s no comparison.

Table Rock is absolutely gorgeous. It is an Army Corps of Engineers Lake, which means it’s maintained very differently from our privately owned Lake of the Ozarks. The water is so clear in fact, that they scuba dive here; some claim you can see the bottom as far down as 40 feet. From my personal experience, the water clarity IS incredible. There’s limited building and docks along the shoreline. A two-layer rock shelf wrapped the shoreline around the entire campsite area. I was able to walk with our dog along that shelf around the entire cove, in calf-deep water. We stopped several times to sit on the shelf and cool off in the breaking waves. I was taking photos of the boats and bridge, but Olivia became something of a celebrity to passing wave runners and pontoons, they were stopping on the water to take pictures of her and wave at us while we walked. We checked out some stacked rocks along the shore and chased a few minnows.

Our campsite was only a few minutes’ drive to downtown Branson. The $16 sites had water available, you can also get them with electric and other amenities. We went to the nearby pavilion to charge batteries and cell phones when necessary. The toilets are unfortunately not plumbed, but for outdoor toilets, they were very well cleaned and maintained. There are shower rooms on site and a marina if you need to restock ice or pick up essentials. We didn’t rent a boat or do any diving, but there are plenty of rental options available if we’d been interested.

Great place to for camping and the water was amazing. I’d absolutely go for a return visit!

http://www.news-leader.com/article/20130501/LIFE06/305010138/table-rock-lake-clear-water

http://mostateparks.com/park/table-rock-state-park

Camping at Fiery Fork

Fiery Fork Conservation Area

This weekend, I went on my first camping trip in probably 25+ years.
My brother in law, his wife and children are all heavily involved in Boy Scouts and are old pros at the camping scene; but due to some pretty rough experiences camping as a kid, my idea of camping since I’ve been an adult has been a stay at the Ramada Inn. I know this may seem odd, considering my affinity for dirt, rocks and growing things- but the thing is, I love to work with nature, I just don’t know if I love to SLEEP in it. However, my recent camping experience was no where near the nightmarish memories of my youth and I think I’m even willing to do it again!fiery fork 005

The Fiery Fork Conservation Area is just east of Climax Springs on North State Highway 7, if you blink at Granger Lane, you’ll miss the sign. Last summer, the fields below the campgrounds were planted with sunflowers that were higher than my head (doesn’t take too much, I’m only 5’5″). There are several creek areas; it is the Fiery Fork Creek that the park is named for, all winding together to empty into the little Niangua River. Camping at Fiery Fork was my idea. I had driven down there a couple times last summer and discovered it was a really pretty area, not too busy compared to other parks in the Lake Area and conveniently, only about 5 miles from our house. In other words, close enough to go home if I couldn’t commit to spending the night under the stars.

Last summer, at the peak of  the drought, the river was only thigh-deep and much calmer, the water clear enough to see the gravel fiery fork 008bottom. Someone has tied a rope swing to the trees across from the river access; a sandbar that is usually large enough to park a couple cars or launch a canoe from. When the water is in its normal, more tranquil state, the riverside is the perfect Country-Time Lemonade Spot. This weekend was the end of a  very rainy couple of weeks; the river was crazy-full and running very fast, it looked like there was a fair amount of storm debris in all that muddy water too, so we didn’t attempt to swim in it, but took the kids to the creek instead. They explored, saw minnows, held a tadpole, slid around on the moss-covered bridge and collected rocks.

At the campsite, we made Smores around the campfire, grilled hot dogs and breakfast burritos. The campsites are primitive, which means no electric hookups or potable water- but the sites are large and an outdoor toilet is available near each campsite grouping of 4-5 sites each near the river. There is accessible parking near the toilet area and a paved ramp to the wide gated doorway. No sink or running water, take wet wipes with you!fiery fork 009

We had an entire camp area to ourselves, due to the earlier rainy weather, but Saturday evening was clear, sunny and only upper 70’s. The campsites have a metal fire pit with a grate attachment over them for cooking; some of the campsites are right on the Little Niangua; we opted for the wooded area near the creek crossing, it turned out to be the perfect spot for my 4 year old and her cousins to play. The kids set up a badminton net at the adjacent campsite and played a few games before our evening meal.

fiery fork 012The Missouri Department of Conservation site mentions hiking trails from a quarter mile up to a mile and a quarter, marked in blue paint on the trees to find your way. Some of the trails intersect with state and county roads or private property. Hiking wasn’t high on the list of things to do for my camp-mates or the kids, so I just took a few short walks near the campsite and by the Fiery Fork Creek; there is some really gorgeous scenery to look at.

Overall, it was not a bad camping experience. I did discover that a sleeping bag would be a wise purchase before spending a night outside again, I forget that temps in the upper 50’s are REALLY cold if you don’t have a house to protect you! Bug repellent comes in very handy here as we found many, many ticks. I managed to avoid being bit; just wear light colored clothing so they are easy to spot, that way you can remove them before they bite. Missouri woods are full of deer and other wildlife that ticks like to munch on; with all the rain this year, they are especially prolific.fiery fork 032

Bring some firewood with you if you want a fire for warmth, or charcoal for cooking if you don’t have a propane camp stove. The park service makes brochures available at the campsites with rules and regulations of the area. They request that visitors do not cut trees or limbs to get fire wood. We brought along enough for ourselves plus the next 4 or 5 visitors and there was some wood at our site already where the previous occupants had left some as well. So… if you forget your wood, you might check neighboring campsites.fiery fork 013

I heard whippoorwills on and off all night, an owl or two and one lonely coyote howling. Fiery Fork Creek was home to frogs, tadpoles, tiny minnows, crawdads and water snails. It  flows over the road and drops off the other side in a rocky waterfall ending in a small deep pool below before continuing on towards the Little Niangua. Most parts of the creek I was able to walk in Wellies that were just under knee-high without them taking on water.

There was thick forest all around us, but fields across the road and the creek running along and behind the camping area. The Conservation department keeps the grass mowed in and around the campsites. I may have to return to the creek later this summer and do a walk-through to explore more. I love following and exploring creeks in summer, but there are increasingly fewer places to do this around the Lake without encroaching on private property.fiery fork 022

I think what I liked best about Fiery Fork  is that it’s enough removed from the Osage Beach tourist mecca to offer a little quiet exploration, but close enough that it’s convenient to drive to. You can truly immerse yourself in nature here without loud boat engines or wave runners to interrupt the peace and quiet. There aren’t any shops or billboards, there are views of filtered light through tall trees, clear water and plenty of woods and fields to enjoy. 🙂

VD

image

NO…I don’t need to see a doctor. That was in reference to a certain holiday.  I know it’s considered obnoxious by some to post pictures of Valentine’s flowers – but this isn’t accompanied by sappy gushing about how sweet, wonderful and amazingly considerate my husband is. Yes, he brought me these stunning purple ombre orchids on Valentine’s Day. I also told him about all the stunning purple orchids I had seen… at Gerbes… which he had to drive right by on his way back from the doctor’s office… and purple orchids would be a GREAT Valentine’s Day gift…
I probably could have held up a sign with a picture of them and been less subtle, but why press it? He took the hint. 🙂
I just wanted to share a picture of them, since plants ARE a big part of this site and they ARE really gorgeous. And to think I used to avoid these beauties because I was convinced they are hard to grow. African violets are hard to grow. These are easier than cactus, give me spectacular blooms several times a year and look so freaking cool! Even the way the roots climb out of the pot is neat. They look as if they’ll just climb out, scamper across the desk and go for a stroll.
And now you know why I have more plants than people around me.
-B

Bragging Rights

Just had to brag a bit…
I opened the new Calendar from the Westside Star (a local newspaper for the west side of the Lake of the Ozarks) and two of my photos had been chosen!!! So I’m feeling a bit like a celebrity tonight. 🙂
The one of the snowman and my daughter won a Reader’s Choice Award from the Westside Star’s vote poll of the best photos submitted for the 2013 calendar. The photo of our dog, Olivia in Papa’s bird bath is featured for the month of August.
calendar 001

calendar 002

-Belle

Drought drought and oh yeah, drought.

The part of my yard that I’m not watering every other day has long since died sometime back in June. The rest has only survived because it was so well established, happened to be native weed type plants, or I watered it at least every other day. So since I’ve not been doing a lot in the yard due to the current state of no rain for MONTHS, I haven’t had much to write about in the way of projects.
Thought I would share some photos at least:

This was my 13th wedding anniversary present. I’ve wanted one of these for years! It’s already covered in blooms and smells amazing. 🙂

This little guy was hanging out on the side of our house one night. I thought to snap a picture of him then, but he had wandered off while I went in search of my camera. I discovered him visiting again while watering one evening. This time he sat still patiently under my cactus while I took several shots.

Like most everyone else in the Midwest, I’ve spent the last two months wishing for rain and watching the sky. These clouds only produced a few sprinkles, but the way the sun was shining through them was pretty, so I stopped in Camdenton and snapped this pic.

So far, Mo. DNR is predicting the current drought will remain or worsen between now and October. I’ll be working on some inside projects until then and hoping our well holds out until the rain returns!

-B